Chelation Treatments

Chelation Treatments

Chelation therapy became very popular during the World War I. This was primarily because it was the only method then used to remove heavy metal poisoning from the bodies of the affected soldiers who became the victims of metal poisoning by getting exposed to arsenic gas. Since then, it is considered to be a traditional therapy for removal of metal poisoning.

Soldiers were badly affected by the side effects of a substance called dimercaprol which was used for chelation therapy. Dimercaprol bonded with arsenic particles and thus, the toxic arsenic was removed by liver. As time passed by and the World War II came up, the utility of chelation therapy again came into existence. Many of the soldiers used to get affected by the poisoning of lead as lead was use to repaint the ships. Because of the side effects of the chemical dimercaprol, scientists started searching for alternatives and then emerged the DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid), which had fewer side effects as compared to the previous one. It is mostly used in western medicines and is considered to be the best for removing metal poisoning.

Chelation therapy can be either given intravenously or it can be taken orally, depending on the condition. EDTA (ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) is very effective in treating poisoning due to metals. Use of chelation therapy fortreating hardening of arteries, a condition stated as atherosclerosis, is gaining importance. Scientists are looking for its optimal use in treating cardiovascular disorders. However, the American Medical Association, American Heart Association and the US Food and Drug Administration criticize chelation therapy, condemn the use of oral chelators that are sold off the shelves, and also question the ethics of manufacturers who produce them.

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Chelation Treatments