Diagrams Of A Pigs Circulatory System

Diagrams Of A Pigs Circulatory System

The circulatory system of pigs comprises of the heart, blood vessels and blood. The heart of the pig is four-chambered like in all mammals. The heart is made up of two upper chambered auricles, and two muscular lower chambered ventricles. The heart rate of an adult pig is 70 beats per minute.

The heart pumps the blood into two separate systems -- one to and from the lungs, and the other to the rest of the body. Blood is returned from the lungs to the heart by the pulmonary veins. The blood from the rest of the body is returned to the heart via a network of veins, which end up in the anterior and posterior vena cava. The auricles get blood from the veins and pass it on to the ventricles. 

Deoxygenated blood enters the right auricle, and is then sent into the right ventricle.  From there, the two pulmonary arteries deliver the deoxygenated blood to the lungs. 

Oxygenated blood is then returned from the lungs to the heart by the pulmonary veins. It is received by the left auricle and pumped into the left ventricle and finally pumped out through the aorta to the rest of the body. 

The blood is taken to the rest of the body of the pig by muscular arteries. They eventually branch off into smaller arteries, which, in turn, branch off into even smaller arterioles. The arterioles in their turn branch off into capillaries, which are microscopic tubes. It is in the capillaries that the exchange of fluid takes place. The cells in the body receive nutrients and oxygen from the capillaries and send the unwanted carbon dioxide to the capillaries.  

The capillaries now slowly unite to form small venules which slowly become larger veins. The blood they carry has low levels of oxygen and large amounts of carbon dioxide. They are returned to the heart by the anterior and posterior vena cava to begin their next circulation to the lungs.

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Diagrams Of A Pigs Circulatory System