Physics Of Immune System

Physics Of Immune System

The immune system is one of nature's added enthralling contraptions. Effortlessly, it guards us against billions of bacteria, viruses, and other parasites. Nearly all of us never think upon the reality so as to while we hang out with our friends, watch TV, or go to school, inside our bodies our immune system is constantly vigilant, and offensive at the first sign of an invasion by unsafe organisms.

If the immune system goes these extra miles in ensuring we live an infection-free life, would not it be worthwhile then if we take a couple of minutes in appreciating the physics of the immune system? Being a very complicated system, the immune system is made of several types of cells and proteins that have diverse jobs apportioned to each in the war against foreign bodies.

The Complement System is an assembly of proteins which coat intruders so that eater cells are more apt to consume them. Next is an assemblage of immune cells which are experts in digging out and "ingesting" bacteria, viruses, and dead or injured body cells. There are three major kinds, the granulocyte, the macrophage, and the dendritic cell. The granulocytes often take the first stand during an infection; the macrophages are slower to respond to invaders than the granulocytes; while the dendritic cells are "eater" cells and consume intruders, like the granulocytes and the macrophages.

Lymphocytes -- T cells and B cells -- feed cells into the body and sifts out dead cells and raiding organisms such as bacteria. Other physical attributes of the immune system are the plasma cell and the memory cell.

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Physics Of Immune System