How Much Lead Can Cause Lead Poisoning.

How Much Lead Can Cause Lead Poisoning ? Lead poisoning, also known as saturnism, plumbism or painter’s colic, is a medical condition that can be best described as presence of excessive amounts of lead in the blood of a person.

Lead is a highly toxic metal whose exposure can lead to a wide range of adverse health effects. Presence of heavy amounts of lead in the bloodstream can cause serious damage to the nervous system, renal failure, cardiovascular disorders and reproductive toxicity.

People get exposed to lead in numerous ways. Lead is present in household dust, bare soil, air, drinking water, food, hair dyes, home remedies, ceramics and various other cosmetic products. However, the most prominent source of lead poisoning is the lead-based paint. People working in lead mines have the heaviest exposure to lead. Lead poisoning can occur through the water coming from old plumbing fixtures with lead soldering and imported food cans with lead soldering.

Infants and younger children have the highest risk of getting exposed to lead. Absorbance rate of lead in children is phenomenally higher than adults. Children absorb 40-50 percent of lead that gets into their mouth. In adults, this absorbance is less than 10 percent. Lead poisoning can be diagnosed through blood tests. Levels of lead in the blood are measured in micrograms per deciliter (mg/dL). Blood lead levels over 10mg/dL are considered as “lead poisoning”. Depending on how much lead is present, one can categorize lead poisoning as severe or mild. Severe lead poisoning can be fatal. In case of mild lead poisoning, children have symptoms such as anemia, abdominal pain, severe colic, attention problems, hyperactivity and mental retardation.

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How Much Lead Can Cause Lead Poisoning.