Ginkgo Does Not Prevent Alzheimer's Disease

Ginkgo Does Not Prevent Alzheimer's Disease

      For a long time, many experts have been advocating the use of dietary ginkgo supplement as a way to promote memory. However, a recent study conducted by the University of Virginia School of Medical has found that ginkgo does not prevent the development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in older people.

 

      Earlier research done on ginkgo does show that the extract from the leaves of ginkgo tree does have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties but the results for the connection between ginkgo and memory were inclusive. However, this did not stop the surge in the sales of ginkgo extract and many Americans across the nation, especially the older ones, take ginkgo extract diligently. It is believed that ginkgo prevents the build up of a protein related to Alzheimer's disease.

      The new study took 3,000 men and women, 75 years and older, and half of them were randomly given 120 milligrams of ginkgo twice a day while the other half were given placebos.

      Every six months the group was screened for dementia and after 6 years it was found that dementia occurred in both groups at the same rate. 277 people got dementia in the group that were assigned daily ginkgo and 246 people got dementia in the group that was assigned placebos. The same rate of occurrence was found when the two groups were checked for Alzheimer's disease.

      The study concluded that ginkgo was safe to take. However, there rate of heart attacks and gastrointestinal bleeding were the same in both groups; although the group taking ginkgo had 16 strokes from bleeding in the brain compared to 8 in the group on placebo. The researchers feel that the difference in number of strokes is too small to be of any consequence.

Ginkgo Does Not Prevent Alzheimer's Disease