Two Genes Work in Tandem to Spur Deadliest Brain Cancer

Two Genes Work in Tandem to Spur Deadliest Brain Cancer

         Researchers have found that two genes work together to stimulate glioblastoma, the deadliest form of brain cancer. This is the same brain cancer that caused the death of Senator Ted Kennedy in August 2009.Researchers found that nearly 60 percent of patients with glioblastoma had both the genes and the prognosis for those patients was quite adverse.

         The research was conducted by the Columbia University Medical Center's Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center located in New York. The researchers found that the brain tumors that expressed these two genes had a worse clinical outcome. This finding is a step forward as the genes found by the researchers is not considered to be a marker. Rather these genes are suppose to be regulators that cause the brain tumor.

          Through this finding, it has brought the researchers closer to finding new therapies to help patients with glioblastoma. The researchers are now trying figure out which compounds can work successfully in blocking the function of the proteins that stimulate the genes.

         Glioblastoma multiforme is a highly aggressive form of brain cancer. It has the ability to quickly and very easily affect the healthy brain tissue that is around the tumor. So, maybe it apt that one group of researchers has named this cancer The Terminator.

        The two genes that have been identified by the researchers do not cause any problems on their own. However, when they work together, they end up switching on numerous other genes that cause a lot of problems in the body.

        Researchers found that all the patients who had the two genes switched on died compared to one-half of the patients who had other types of brain tumors.

Two Genes Work in Tandem to Spur Deadliest Brain Cancer