Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage

Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage

        A study conducted by the researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands has found that people who have asthma and who also smoke can undo some of the damage done to their lungs by quitting smoking.

        The researchers found that cigarette smoke tends to thicken the lining of the airways in the lungs. This could be the major cause why asthmatic patients who smoke suffer from more symptoms of asthma compared to asthmatic patients who do not smoke. The asthmatic patients who smoke tend to complain of shortness of breath and more production of phlegm.

        147 asthmatic patients took part in the study. 35 participants were smokers, 46 were ex-smokers and 66 were non-smokers who have never smoked cigarettes. It was found that smokers had more mucus producing cells compared to non-smokers who had never smoked. This finding suggests that the production of phlegm in asthmatic patients could be linked to the smoking. In addition, researchers also found that the airways of the lungs were inflamed in smokers, a condition not present in non-smokers. Also, the researchers found that the thickening of the lining of the airways of the lungs could return to normal if the asthmatic patients stopped smoking.

        The study basically highlights the importance of quitting smoking and how kicking the habit can prove to be beneficial for the lungs, especially in asthmatic patients. This should be incentive enough for people who have been contemplating about stopping smoking, and those suffering from asthma should seriously consider about giving up smoking for good. Asthmatics Who Quit Smoking May Reverse Lung Damage