Mortality Rates Of Open Heart Surgery

Mortality Rates Of Open Heart Surgery

Heart disease is a leading cause of death. Different treatments are recommended for patients with coronary heart disease. For some people, change in life style such as dietary changes, no smoking and regular exercise has resulted in improvement in their health. In other cases medication prescribed for high blood pressure or other conditions has made sufficient difference.

In some cases procedures such as coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) are recommended. CABG is a surgical procedure in which a vein or an artery from another part of the body is used to create an alternative path for the blood to flow to the heart bypassing the blocked artery. One or more bypasses may be performed in the course of the operation. Providing several routes for the blood supply to travel is expected to improve the long term success of the procedure.

Just like any other surgery, this procedure has associated risks. The patient is totally anesthetized and there is recovery period in the hospital and several weeks of recuperation at home. There is risk of relapse and this may need another operation. By CABG procedure alone the patient is not cured. If the patient continues with his life style, the grafted blood vessels also can develop blockages. Patients need to reduce risk factors to minimize new blockages.

As per the statistical data generated, the New York state’s coronary bypass surgery death rate has dropped from 3.52 per 100 in 1989 to a low of 2.22 per 100 patients in 1997.

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Mortality Rates Of Open Heart Surgery