Parent Friendly Immunization Guide

Parent Friendly Immunization Guide

Childhood diseases like diarrhea, polio, measles, chicken pox and whooping cough can cause long term disability and sometimes even death. Vaccination protects children against these fatal diseases or reduces the severity of certain diseases by producing disease specific antibodies.

Parent friendly immunizations guide is a compilation of generally accepted recommendations of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and Advisory Committee on Immunizations Practices (ACIP) and of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The ACIP, AAP, and AAFP issues joint guidelines on childhood immunizations annually.

Some of the recommendations in parent friendly immunization guide on childhood immunizations are:

  • Routine immunizations should not be given to moderately or severely ill persons during the previous twenty-four hours. However, the presence of mild illness with or without fever is not usually a contraindication to immunizations.
  • As required under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act, all health care providers in the United States who administer vaccine to any child or adult, prior to administration of each dose provide a copy of relevant current edition vaccine information’s materials produced by the centers for diseases control and prevention (CDC).
  • All health care providers who administering these vaccines must keep a permanent medical record of each patient like name, address and title of the individual who administers the vaccine.
  • TST and measles-containing vaccines can be administered at the same visit. Simultaneously administering TST and measles-containing vaccines does not interfere with reading the TST result at 48-72 hours and ensures that the person has received measles vaccines.
  • Available data suggests that intervals between doses longer than those routinely recommended do not affect seroconversion rate or titer when schedule was completed. Consequently it is not necessary to restart the series or add doses of any vaccines because of an extended interval between the doses.
  • Vaccine for children program is federally funded state-operated vaccine distribution program. 
  • Vaccines, especially live virus vaccines are fragile substances. To ensure potency, vaccines are to be stored and handled as recommended by the manufacturer in the package insert.
  • Vaccine adverse events reporting systems (VAERS) is the national program that monitors the safety of vaccines after they are licensed and is jointly administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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Parent Friendly Immunization Guide