Facts About Corn Snakes

Facts About Corn Snakes

Corn snakes are harmless non venomous snakes that belong to the Pantherophis Guttatus species and live in the wild southeastern parts of the US. These snakes have checkers on their belly that resemble the shape of the Indian corn. Rat snakes, milk snakes and king snakes are different classifications of the corn snake variety.

Corn snakes are generally found in parts of Missouri, Florida and Virginia. They are generally named based on the place of origin. For instance, the snake species that are native of Southern Florida are called Miami Corn Snake. The colors range from black, orange, brown and yellow. They are found on trees as well as on ground and hence, they are semi-arboreal by nature. They are quite active during dusk as well as dawn and during the day, they bask in the sun.

Corn snakes lay 1 egg clutch per year where the sizes of the clutch vary anywhere between 1 and 30 depending the subspecies, the age and size of the female. The incubation period for the corn snakes species is anywhere between 55 and 70 days on an average at a temperature ranging from 78 – 84 degrees F. However, the females hardly care for the young ones during the incubation period

Young corn snakes grow the about 1’ to 2’ every year and primarily feed on rodents or small mice at least once in a week or two depending on their age. Adult corn snakes can even feed on a whole adult mice or a number of small rats.

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Facts About Corn Snakes