Patient Education On Mononucleosis

Patient Education On Mononucleosis

Mononucleosis, caused by the Epstein-Barr virus belonging to the herpes family, is a glandular fever that affects the health of individuals. It is also called “kissing disease”, infectious mononucleosis, mono, or EBV. Mostly, the virus is dormant and remains in the body lifelong without showing much symptoms. But in some cases, the disease leads to severe chronic infection.

The virus spreads mainly through salivary contact of the infected person. It can also spread either by kissing or sharing common utensils which could contain the infected saliva. It can also be spread from mouth to hand which may contain contaminated saliva which gets sprayed while the infected person sneezes or coughs.

The virus can spread even up to a year after the diagnosis of the disease. Common symptoms include constant fatigue, fever, sore throat, enlarged spleen, swollen lymph nodes, body aches, muscle weakness and pain and appetite loss. Chronic illness could cause rupture of spleen or inflammation of the heart which could cause grave illness to the patients.

The symptoms are seen anytime between 4 to 7 weeks after the virus infects the system. But the illness generally goes away in a month automatically if some basic health care is taken.

One of the most common recommendations for this infection is complete best rest during the course of the disease, healthy balanced diet including adequate amount of fluids, smoothies and low fat shakes to relieve pain in the throat, ibuprofen and acetaminophen for fever and body aches and also salt water gargling. Antibiotics are not very effective to treat the infection as viruses do not respond to antibiotics.

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Patient Education On Mononucleosis